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Growers gain a Cornell-tested, environmentally friendlier strategy in their Integrated Pest Management program

ITHACA, N.Y. -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has granted a one-year approval for a novel plant protectant that has been tested at Cornell University as a seed coating for onions. This new treatment promises to help save New York's onion crop, providing that it can gain full approval for use beyond 1996. New York onion growers may use Trigard on onion seed this growing season to combat the onion maggot, according to integrated pest management experts at Cornell's Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, N.Y.

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Nominations sought for Perkins award at Cornell

ITHACA, N.Y. -- Nominees for the 1996 Perkins Prize for Interracial Understanding and Harmony are now being accepted by the Dean of Students Office at Cornell University. The $5,000 annual prize was established last year by Trustee Thomas W. Jones and was presented at an award ceremony in the A.D. White House on Thursday, May 4. Participating in the ceremony were Jones, President Emeritus James A. Perkins, then-President Frank H.T. Rhodes and Dean of Students John L. Ford.

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Project 2000, a strategy for organizational change at Cornell, is unveiled

ITHACA, N.Y. -- Project 2000, Creating a Best Managed University, a strategy for organizational change designed to make Cornell a model for effective university administration and to enable the university to target its resources on academic excellence, has been announced by Cornell University President Hunter Rawlings. Rawlings said Project 2000 will be part of a larger effort to make Cornell's administrative processes more effective and efficient, and to attain financial equilibrium. By reconfiguring the way Cornell conducts its business, he said, Project 2000 will allow the university to concentrate more fully on its core mission of teaching, research and public service

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Moving frequently helps explain why maltreated children

ITHACA, N.Y. -- A major reason why maltreated children do worse in school than nonmaltreated children may be because their families move much more frequently and they change schools often, according to a recent award-winning Cornell University study. The study found that during their school years abused and neglected children move, on average, twice as frequently as other children. Previous work by the Cornell researchers had found that maltreated children do significantly worse in school and have many more discipline problems than children who are not abused or neglected.

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Cornell student wins Luce scholarship for a year in Asia

ITHACA, N.Y. -- When Maureen Quigley receives her master's degree in public administration from Cornell University this May, she'll be updating her passport as well as her rŽsumŽ. Quigley, a student of international development policy in Cornell's Institute for Public Affairs (CIPA), has received a Luce Scholarship, which will fund a one-year internship in Asia to be arranged specifically for her. She is one of 18 Luce Scholars chosen this year from approximately 60 U.S. colleges and universities, and the 10th from Cornell since the scholarships were first awarded in 1974.

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Anthony Seeger returns to Cornell March 24 thru 29 as professor at large

ITHACA, N.Y. -- Anthony Seeger, curator of the Folkways Collection and director of Folkways Recordings at the Smithsonian Institution, will make his third visit to Cornell University on March 24-29 as an A.D. White Professor-at-Large. On Wednesday, March 27, he will give a public talk entitled "From the Suy‡ Indians to the Grateful Dead: 'Thanks,' " at 4:30 p.m. in the Hollis E. Cornell Auditorium of Goldwin Smith Hall. Seeger, one of the world's foremost ethnomusicologists and folklorists, will discuss the Amazon Indians' struggle to preserve their environment and culture, and their support from nonprofit organizations, including one founded by former members of the Grateful Dead.

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Future workplace will be mobile and may include space from cafes, warehouses, Cornell expert says

ITHACA, N.Y. -- The boom in telecommuting is just a transition toward a future total-workplace system of where work gets accomplished. New sites range from the car, home and home office to hotels, offices of business alliances, neighborhood telebusiness centers, empty warehouses, banks and storefronts, airline clubs and perhaps even local cafes. That is according to Franklin Becker, an organizational ecologist and Cornell University professor of human-environment relations who will speak on the changing workplace at Cornell's Johnson Graduate School of Management European Symposium, "The Workplace Revolution" in London on March 16.

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The greatest impact of new technology is on the supply chain, not the factory floor, says Cornell manufacturing expert

ITHACA, N.Y. -- Technological advances will continue to have profound effects on manufacturing firms. But the most important changes will come in the ways companies manage their supply chains and inventories, said L. Joseph Thomas, professor of manufacturing at Cornell University's Johnson Graduate School of Management. Such changes require a major investment, he added, but those companies that come to it late are going to be left out. Thomas will be a featured speaker at "The Workplace Revolution," a Johnson School-sponsored symposium in London on March 16. Thomas will discuss "Information Technology and the Manufacturing Firm: Work and Competition in the Next Decade." The symposium begins at 8:45 a.m. at the Four Seasons Hotel (formerly Inn on the Park) on Park Lane.

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Planetary material is shared throughout the inner solar system: Pieces of the moon, Mars, Mercury or Venus could land on Earth -- and vice versa

ITHACA, N.Y. -- Planets and their satellites in the inner solar system -- including Earth -- have been sharing bits and pieces of themselves for billions of years, as even today rocks and particles shorn off from ongoing collisions continue their interplanetary voyage, new research shows.

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'Internet mogul' featured in annual Cornell engineering conference April 12-13

The future of information technology -- from wireless communications to new imaging systems -- is the topic of the 1996 Cornell Society of Engineers annual conference April 12 and 13 at Cornell.

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Cornell's John Hopcroft tells Congress of the importance of investing in research and education

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Investments in research and education are essential for the nation's well-being and budget priorities should reflect that, a Cornell University engineer told a congressional panel today (March 6, 1996). "There is no investment that is more essential for our nation's future well-being than investments in research and education," John E. Hopcroft, the Joseph Silbert Dean of Engineering at Cornell University, told lawmakers. "If we do not build on the achievements that science and engineering research have made possible, we may well jeopardize the momentum we have built since World War II."

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Cornell reports increase in undergraduate applications

ITHACA, N.Y. -- Applications for admission to Cornell University for fall 1996 have reached the third-highest level in the institution's history, a 2 percent increase over last year. Applications from underrepresented minority groups, with the exception of Native Americans, also increased over last year to be at or near the highest levels for these groups in the past decade, reports Donald A. Saleh, Cornell acting dean of admissions and financial aid. Overall, applications from all ethnic groups are up 5 percent over last year (2,071 compared with 1,972).