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Cornell University appoints Alumni Affairs director

ITHACA, N.Y. -- Mary F. Berens, a 1974 graduate of Cornell University, has been appointed director of alumni affairs at the university, said Inge T. Reichenbach, vice president for alumni affairs and development. Berens succeeds James D. Hazzard, a 1950 Cornell graduate.

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New York FarmNet is helping farmers, as financial management calls increase to one-third

ITHACA, N.Y. -- Good news for the New York state agricultural industry: family farms are being helped, thanks in large part to FarmNet, a state-funded, Cornell University-based program. The number of financial distress calls to the program has markedly dropped, but the number of financial planning requests has increased, according to the annual statistics released by the program. There was also a substantial increase in the number of calls, overall. "FarmNet is the only source that farmers have that they can refer to for unbiased help," said Metford Frost, Onondaga dairy farmer and board member of the Onondaga County Farm Bureau. "It's keyed to farm needs and sorting out the problems and then looking at the alternative solutions."

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Cornell's Bruce Ganem wins chemistry award

ITHACA, N.Y. -- Bruce Ganem, the Franz and Elisabeth Roessler Professor of Chemistry and chair of the Chemistry Department at Cornell University, has received the Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award from the American Chemical Society (ACS). The award, which includes a $25,000 unrestricted research grant, recognizes and encourages excellence in organic chemistry.

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Cornell historian's discovery leads to greater understanding of 19th-century black America

ITHACA, N.Y. -- Amos Webber (1826-1904) perhaps never intended there would be a biography written of him. After all, his life as a black man born free in the North, as a Civil War soldier, as a servant and janitor was the not an experience that captured headlines. His was a life that could be overlooked easily by historians and others who document America's past. But Webber did intend for someone to read about his life, for he wrote more than 2,000 pages worth of his thoughts and views on 19th-century American life.

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Cornell's Homeless Program Hosts Guest Lecture Series

ITHACA, N.Y. -- Five individuals who have dedicated their lives to feeding and housing the homeless will participate in a lecture series this spring at Cornell University. The lecture series is part of Cornell's Housing and Feeding the Homeless Program, which began in 1988. The program, offered through the School of Hotel Administration, provides students with opportunities to work in classrooms, temporary and transitional shelters and food banks that distribute surplus, discarded and nonmarketable food to social service agencies.

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Cornell's John Guckenheimer to become SIAM president in 1997

ITHACA, N.Y. -- John Guckenheimer, Cornell University professor of mathematics and of theoretical and applied mechanics, was selected president of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM). He will begin his two-year term in January 1997. Guckenheimer also is director of research at the Cornell Theory Center (CTC) and director of the Center for Applied Mathematics. His selection was a "singular honor, well deserved," according to Malvin H. Kalos, director of the Theory Center.

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Deadly dog virus appears in surprising species, not just dogs

For now, the epizootic that killed a third of the lions in Tanzania's Serengeti National Park is under control, according to the Cornell University veterinarian who pinned the fatal outbreak on canine distemper virus (CDV).

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Cornell coordinates collaborative computer project

For the first time in textile/apparel education, students from three colleges are using computer technology and the Internet to simulate the way apparel will be designed in the near future.

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New Cornell food guide pyramid and fact sheets feature

ITHACA, N.Y. -- To help Northeast consumers choose foods that are not only healthful but also regional and seasonal, Cornell Cooperative Extension offers the new Northeast Regional Food Guide. Eating locally supports farmers and the local economy, protects natural resources and preserves regional farmland, said Jennifer Wilkins, Ph.D., R.D., senior extension associate in Cornell University's Division of Nutritional Sciences and author of the materials with Jennifer Bokaer-Smith, nutrition graduate student. The complete set of materials includes eight fact sheets and a food guide pyramid on a 19-by-28-inch color poster.

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New summer program introduces college students to international business

ITHACA, N.Y. -- Glenn Altschuler encounters it a lot these days: the fear among undergraduate students, particularly in the liberal arts, that they won't be sufficiently "marketable" upon graduation. In response, the dean of Cornell University's School of Continuing Education and Summer Sessions and other administrators and faculty have created the Summer Program in International Business, an eight-week curriculum that will give students in fields ranging from anthropology to electrical engineering a hands-on introduction to the business world. The program will run from June 2 to July 27 under the direction of Jonas Pontusson, associate professor of government and a well-known political economist.

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Deadly dog virus appears in surprising species

ITHACA, N.Y. -- For now, the epizootic that killed a third of the lions in Tanzania's Serengeti National Park is under control, according to the Cornell University veterinarian who pinned the fatal outbreak on canine distemper virus (CDV). But veterinarians and conservation biologists must remain vigilant, said Max J.G. Appel, professor of microbiology and immunology at Cornell's Baker Institute for Animal Health, because the dog disease is on the move, turning up in unrelated species and unexpected places. "Canine distemper virus was not supposed to be a major problem in Africa because of the sun and heat," said Appel, noting that CDV is spread through the air in respiratory secretions from infected animals, and that the fragile virus usually does not survive more than a few minutes in open air. Once Appel and Cornell veterinary pathologist Brian A. Summers discovered evidence of CDV infection in lion tissue samples sent from Tanzania, the disease's path was traced: The Serengeti lions are thought to have been infected by spotted hyenas, which share food with lions and which may have been infected by free-roaming domestic dogs around the national park.

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Northeast coastal cities set snowfall records

ITHACA, N.Y. -- Seven locations in the Northeast set snowfall records for the winter season, according to the Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University. Records fell in New York City, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Hartford, Conn., Providence, R.I., Dulles Airport, Va., outside Washington, D.C., and Charleston, W.Va.