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Groundhog Day facts and factoids

Got questions about Groundhog Day? We've got answers. Woodchuck and groundhog are common terms for the same animal, the rodent with the scientific name of Marmota monax.

Cornell student hospitalized with suspected meningococcemia

A Cornell student has been hospitalized with suspected meningococcal disease. Initial tests indicate that the student, a 19-year-old female freshman, is suffering from meningococcemia, a severe bacterial infection in the bloodstream.

Counter-rotating stars are, surprisingly, found in a 'boring'

Cornell astronomers, observing what they call "the most boring, average galaxy" they could find, have discovered some unusual mechanics: counter-rotating stars in a spiral galaxy.

Toxic chemicals in soils may not be as hazardous as once thought

Some toxic chemicals buried in soil may not be as hazardous as once thought because their toxicity decreases over time, according to a Cornell University scientist.

Feline leukemia test and strict quarantine can prevent

Lacking a sure vaccination or cure for feline leukemia, the best way to halt the number-one viral killer of cats is to prevent contact with pets that have it.

Americans retiring earlier but living longer pose challenges

With more Americans retiring earlier yet living longer than ever before, the country has a growing number of vigorous adults who no longer are in their career jobs but are not old. They are in a life stage for which they and society are totally unprepared.

Right-to farm laws help at the local level as farmers learn

BALTIMORE -- Imitating state laws, some town and county governments in New York are reaffirming the practice of farming by enacting right-to-farm laws. The long-term practical effects of such laws are unclear, but farmers are also learning better strategies for getting along with their neighbors, a Cornell University agricultural economist says.

Program's students venture from Ithaca hills to Nepal mountains

Monks chanting at dawn. Snow leopards at twilight. Not images that come to mind for most Cornell University alumni recalling their college experience. But then, the Cornell-Nepal Study Program is anything but ordinary.

Internet's future lies not with big business but with academe, Cornell economist asserts

An economist at Cornell's Johnson Graduate School of Management said the engine carrying the world into the information age could stall if the for-profit sector takes too tight control of the Internet.

Cornell contributes $10,000 to Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services

Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services is another step closer to meeting its annual and capital campaign goals, thanks to a $10,000 contribution from Cornell.

Cornell trustees approve 4.5 percent endowed tuition hike 1996

The Cornell University Board of Trustees, at its January meeting in New York City, approved a 1996-97 budget that calls for a 4.5 percent tuition increase for the endowed colleges.

New book co-authored by Cornell psychologist examines children's reliability in court

Are young children reliable witnesses in court? How easily are their memories distorted? How can interviewing techniques and repeated questioning affect children's reports of events? What can professionals do to elicit accurate testimony from children? These questions are explored in the new book, Jeopardy in the Courtroom: A Scientific Analysis of Children's Testimony, co-authored by award-winning developmental psychologists Stephen J. Ceci, Ph.D., of Cornell University and Maggie Bruck, Ph.D., of McGill University.