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Defining blameworthiness to help make AI moral

Researchers have developed a mathematical model to calculate blameworthiness on a scale from zero to one – a tool that potentially could be used to guide the behavior of artificially intelligent agents, such as driverless vehicles, to help them behave in a “moral” way.

Eight grants focus on innovation in China

The Cornell China Center has announced eight China Innovation Awards to interdisciplinary teams of Cornell faculty, aimed at jump-starting collaborative research and developing research teams.

LeafByte app measures damage from chomping insects

A free, open-source mobile app now lets everyone from plant researchers to gardeners and farmers know exactly how much damage insect pests cause when they chomp on leaves.

Inclusive messages boost women’s participation in online STEM classes

A new study found that adding a photo of women and an inclusivity statement to a Facebook ad for a computer science course increased the number of women who clicked on the ad by 26 percent.

Digital Ag Hackathon tackles pressing agricultural problems

Cornell’s first Digital Agriculture Hackathon saw students from a variety of disciplines come together to develop ways of addressing some of the world’s most pressing agricultural challenges.

BanQu CEO illuminates blockchain path to social justice

At the Cornell Business Impact Symposium, keynote speaker Ashish Gadnis described a pathway to positive social impact that could help people around the world rise from poverty, reduce gender inequality, vanquish black markets and bring light to shadow economies.

Einaudi Center funds Cornell dissertations with global impact

Twelve graduate students will spend this year refining their dissertation plans and testing the waters of global research with help from the Einaudi-SSRC Dissertation Proposal Development Program.

In competition, people get discouraged by competent robots

A Cornell-led team has found that when robots are beating humans in contests for cash prizes, people consider themselves less competent and expend slightly less effort – and they tend to dislike the robots, too.

With help from AI, microservices divvy up tasks to improve cloud apps

As applications grow more complex, companies such as Twitter, Amazon and Netflix are turning to microservices – scores of small applications, each performing a single function and communicating over the network to work together.