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Cornell conservationists propose allowing wild animals to roam parts of North America

If Cornell University researchers and their colleagues have their way, cheetahs, lions, elephants, camels and other large wild animals may soon roam parts of North America. (Aug. 17, 2005)

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Cornell ecologist's study finds that producing ethanol and biodiesel from corn and other crops is not worth the energy

Turning plants such as corn, soybeans and sunflowers into fuel uses much more energy than the resulting ethanol or biodiesel generates, according to a new Cornell University and University of California-Berkeley study.

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Summit pulls together what Cornell should pursue in quest to be more sustainable

How can the Cornell campus do more when it comes to energy efficiency, recycling, reducing pollution, preserving green areas and other efforts that promote sustainability?

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Secrets of whales' long-distance songs are being unveiled by U.S. Navy's undersea microphones -- but sound pollution threatens

For nearly nine years Cornell University researcher Christopher Clark has been listening to whale songs and calls in the North Atlantic using the navy's antisubmarine listening system.

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Ethanol fuel from corn faulted as 'unsustainable subsidized food burning' in analysis by Cornell scientist

Neither increases in government subsidies to corn-based ethanol fuel nor hikes in the price of petroleum can overcome what one Cornell University agricultural scientist calls a fundamental input-yield problem: It takes more energy to make ethanol from grain than the combustion of ethanol produces. (August 7, 2001)

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Researchers learn what it takes to make the bluebird of happiness happy

Sixteen years of hard work and setbacks have taught Professor Emeritus Richard B. Fischer what it takes to make the bluebird of happiness happy: Location, location, location. And a few amenities.

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Toxic pollen from widely planted, genetically modified corn can kill monarch butterflies, Cornell study shows

An increasingly popular commercial corn, genetically engineered to produce a bacterial toxin to protect against corn pests, has an unwanted side effect: Its pollen kills monarch butterfly larvae in laboratory tests, according to a report by Cornell University researchers.

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Alien animals, plants and microbes cost U.S. $123 billion a year, Cornell ecologists report

A few bad actors among the more than 30,000 non-indigenous species in the United States cost $123 billion a year in economic losses, Cornell University ecologists estimate. "It doesn't take many trouble-makers to cause tremendous damage," Cornell ecologist David Pimentel.

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U.S. could feed 800 million people with grain that livestock eat, Cornell ecologist advises animal scientists

From one ecologist's perspective, the American system of farming grain-fed livestock consumes resources far out of proportion to the yield, accelerates soil erosion, affects world food supply and will be changing in the future.