Skip to main content

The cocktail party effect: Fish and human brains perform 'auditory scene analysis' when looking for love in all the loud places

Cornell biologists, who became underwater disc jockeys to study a homely fish that hums, say they have a clue as to how mate selection works. The auditory portion of the midbrain uses the acoustic qualities of all the noise to isolate one signal it is programmed to recognize as potentially interesting.

Fetal lead exposure may increase risk for asthma, allergies and cancer, Cornell studies with rats show

Lead in the drinking water of pregnant rats causes long-term damage to the immune systems of their offspring, according to studies at the Cornell University Institute for Comparative and Environmental Toxicology.

Food bacteria-spice survey shows why some cultures like it hot

Humans' use of antimicrobial spices developed in parallel with food-spoilage microorganisms, Cornell University biologists have demonstrated in a international survey of spice use in cooking. (March 4, 1998)

Salmonellosis (Public Health Concerns for the Farm Family and Staff)

Two fact sheets about salmonellosis. What is salmonellosis? How is it spread? Conditions under which salmonella survive in the environment? What are the symptoms of salmonella infection in humans?

Four-legged 'Cornell Companions' draw kids out of their shells in Veterinary College's animal-assisted therapy program

Just when the world's getting really confusing and you're not feeling good about yourself, when it seems nobody will listen -- or even sit when you tell them to -- along come the Cornell Companions.

Vet College researchers seek 'spraying' cats for study of new treatment

Cats with the annoying habit of spraying urine on vertical surfaces are needed at the Cornell College of Veterinary Medicine for a clinical trial of a new treatment.

Kimmel Scholar H. Alex Brown builds research team in search of anti-cancer drug

H. Alex Brown, Ph.D., assistant professor of pharmacology and newly named Kimmel Foundation Scholar in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell, is assembling a research team to study the function of phospholipase D, a natural enzyme that is believed to be a crucial biochemical link in the cell-signaling cascade that permits the spread of many kinds of cancer cells.

New Institute for Animal Welfare at Cornell addresses farm, wild and laboratory animal concerns

The Cornell University Institute for Animal Welfare has been established to foster discussion and research on issues concerning animals in agriculture, laboratories and the wild.

Urine-spraying cats sought for Cornell veterinary study

Cats with the annoying habit of spraying urine on vertical surfaces are needed at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine for a clinical trial of a new treatment.