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Rural Humanities Showcase touts Cornell-community projects

Poetry and performance, as well as more traditional presentations, were among the nine projects highlighted in the first Rural Humanities Showcase, held Sept. 6 in the A.D. White House.

Nearly 30% of birds in U.S., Canada have vanished since 1970

A team of scientists from seven institutions has published research that shows a massive loss of nearly 3 billion breeding adult birds since 1970, with devastating losses among birds in every biome.

Visit by esteemed immunologist launches new center

To help launch the new Cornell Center for Immunology, world-renowned immunologist Mark Davis was in Ithaca to give a talk and meet faculty and students. 

Raptor Program students debate Eagles vs. Falcons on NBC

Students in the Cornell Raptor Program staged a mock debate, eagles vs. falcons, on NBC Sports' "Football Night in America" show before the Philadelphia vs. Atlanta NFL game.

Essentials

Cornell veterinarians save black bear cub hit by car

After a female black bear cub was struck by a car over the summer in the Adirondack Park, Cornell veterinary surgeons repaired the bear’s injured left foreleg and sent it on the road to recovery. 

‘Corpse flower’ poised to make another big stink

Carolus, one of Cornell’s two giant Titan arum plants, also known as “corpse flowers,” is getting ready to once again unleash its fetid odor in the Liberty Hyde Bailey Conservatory on Tower Road.

Cornell veterinarians help horse, rider return to ring

When Wrangler, an 11-year-old show horse, was diagnosed with “kissing spine,” veterinarians at the Cornell University Hospital for Animals performed surgery that got horse and rider back into the ring. 

Scientists shocked to discover two new species of electric eel

An international team of scientists has discovered two new species of electric eel, one of which delivers 860 volts; the highest level of electricity generated by any living creature.

Rapid Lyme disease test may be available in late 2020

The drawn-out process for diagnosing Lyme disease could become a thing of the past – good news for the thousands of people each year who get the tick-borne illness.