Missing link identified between immune cells and Alzheimer’s

By studying the effects of immune cells that surround blood vessels in the brain, Weill Cornell Medicine researchers have discovered a new pathway that may contribute to Alzheimer’s disease.

Brain's network may provide insights into neurological disorders

A deeper understanding of the brain’s connectivity network of neurons and its relationship to the organ’s deep tissue could allow recognition of what processes relate to neurological disorders.

Out of the blue: Medieval fragments yield surprises

Researchers Louisa Smieska and Ruth Mullett are advancing studies of medieval illuminated manuscripts with X-ray imaging at CHESS of the pigment trace elements found in pages in Cornell collections.

New device could make closing surgical incisions a cinch

A material strong enough to protect the intestines from a needle puncture and bendable enough to insert through a laparotomy incision that quickly dissolves in the body is being studied.

Glowing and misting, Jenny Sabin's 'Lumen' installation opens

Architect Jenny Sabin has created a temporary outdoor installation that functions as a work of art and provides shade, seating and cooling for visitors to the Museum of Modern Art PS1 in Long Island City.

Enzyme key to triggering anti-cancer immune response

An enzyme implicated in autoimmune diseases and viral infections also regulates radiation therapy's ability to trigger an immune response against cancer, Weill Cornell Medicine scientists found in a new study.

CIS researchers receive $2.5M NSF grant for cybersecurity

Researchers Andrew Myers, Elaine Shi, Greg Morrisett and Rafael Pass will explore a new approach that will make it easier to use cryptography to build more-secure systems.

Resort legend, Lyft founder honored with Hotel School awards

The School of Hotel Administration honored a hotel industry legend and a pioneer in ride-sharing apps at its ninth annual Cornell Hospitality Icon and Innovator Awards June 6 at The Pierre in Manhattan.

Human tissue model developed to test colon cancer drugs

The first-ever 'disease in a Petri dish' platform that models human colon cancer derived from stem cells has been developed by Weill Cornell Medicine investigators, allowing them to identify a targeted drug treatment for a common, inherited form of the disease.