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Impact of biotechnology will be examined Oct. 11 at Cornell symposium

From hepatitis prevention to virtual lab animals on a chip, five scientific advances with the potential to change society will be examined at a symposium on Monday, Oct. 11, from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Cornell.

Gold finds our deep hot biosphere teeming with life - and controversy

In a new book, The Deep Hot Biosphere, Cornell professor emeritus of astronomy Thomas Gold argues that subterranean bacteria started the whole evolutionary process, and that there's no looming energy shortage because oil reserves are far greater than predicted.

Galileo finds Jupiter's rings formed by dust blasted off small moons

Jupiter's intricate, swirling ring system is formed by dust kicked up as interplanetary meteoroids smash into the giant planet's four, small inner moons, according to scientists studying data from NASA's Galileo spacecraft. Images sent by Galileo also reveal that the outermost ring is actually two rings, one embedded within the other.

High-pressure scientists 'journey' to the center of the Earth, but can't find elusive metallic hydrogen

Hydrogen, as any materials scientist will tell you, is a tough nut to crack. It is the simplest of the atoms, but in its molecular, or solid state it is incredibly complex. The long-sought goal of turning the element into a metal, it has been predicted, would require pressure close to that found at the center of the Earth.

It might wobble and stagger, but Cornell's headless robot is providing insights into how humans walk

It doesn't have a brain or a heart, and its walk is a little like the scarecrow's, but a little headless, armless, trunkless two-legged robot, developed at Cornell University, can walk, wobble, hobble, limp, stride and stagger. But it can't stand still in any position without falling over. (April 7, 1998)

Cornell participates in project that supports women studying science

Cornell will be one of 15 universities participating in a new project to support women studying science and engineering. Called "MentorNet," the project will use the Internet and electronic mail to connect female engineering, science and math students.

Smallest guitar, about the size of a human blood cell, illustrates new technology for nano-sized electromechanical devices

The world's smallest guitar — carved out of crystalline silicon and no larger than a single cell — has been made at Cornell University to demonstrate a new technology that could have a variety of uses in fiber optics, displays, sensors and electronics.

Stanford chemist Richard Zare to lecture at Cornell on March 31 on Martian meteorite

Richard N. Zare, the Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor of Chemistry at Stanford University, will give the Harry S. Kieval Lecture In Physics at Cornell on Monday, March 31.

21st century medicine is topic for 12th annual Cornell Biotechnology Symposium on Oct. 15

Three advanced technologies are about to expand the horizons of health care, speakers at the 12th annual Cornell Biotechnology Symposium, "Frontiers in Biomedicine," will predict on Oct. 15 from 9 a.m. to 12:05 p.m. in the ground floor conference room of the Biotechnology Building at Cornell.