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Cornell Media Relations Office is the university's representative to local, regional, national and international media organizations. Part of University Relations, Media Relations works across the university to connect faculty experts and thought leaders with print, broadcast and digital media.

Day Hall · Cornell University · Ithaca, NY 14853607-255-6074mediarelations@cornell.edu@CornellMedia 

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The New York apple industry's boost to the state economy is 21 percent greater than traditional models have suggested, according to a new study published by Todd Schmit, an associate professor at the Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management. Schmit's research used data collected by the Cornell Cooperative Extension.

In The News

Bart Selman, a professor of computer science at Cornell University, says that NYC, with all its congestion and constant surprise traffic interruptions, actually offers preternaturally fertile testing ground for driverless cars. 

Discussing spring on Mars, Don Banfield, a principal research scientists at the Cornell Center for Astrophysics and Planetary Sciences, says: “The Northern hemisphere is starting to heat up; the Southern hemisphere cooling off—just like on Earth.” There are seasonal trends, such as summer dust storms, “but without rain and plants, they aren’t quite as obvious,” says Banfield.

Josh Chafetz, a professor at Cornell Law School, says the 1604 decision “both forestalls the sort of dilatory tactics that keep the House from turning to other business and also makes it harder for the Crown to keep bullying members until they vote the way that it wants.”

“We’re at the beginning of understanding how we could balance commercial interests with helping users as individuals,” explains Longqi Yang, a Ph.D. student at Cornell Tech who worked on the project.

Natalie Mahowald, professor of earth and atmospheric sciences in the College of Engineering, says that a 12-year time frame is a “robust number for trying to cut emissions” and to keep the increase in warming under current levels. But she says sketching out unduly dire consequences is not “helpful to solving the problem.”

In this op-ed from Steven Strogatz, professor of applied mathematics for the College of Arts & Sciences, he argues that the famous mathematical ratio, estimated to more than 22 trillion digits (and counting), is the perfect symbol for our species’ long effort to tame infinity.