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Cornell Media Relations Office is the university's representative to local, regional, national and international media organizations. Part of University Relations, Media Relations works across the university to connect faculty experts and thought leaders with print, broadcast and digital media.

Day Hall · Cornell University · Ithaca, NY 14853607-255-6074mediarelations@cornell.edu@CornellMedia 

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When people commit deadly crimes against animals, the corpse has a tale to tell. It’s a veterinary pathologist’s job to translate that story. The Animal Health Diagnostic Center at Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine is one of a few labs in New York state that perform post-mortems on animals.

In The News

Helen Nissenbaum, an information science professor at Cornell Tech, refers to the foundation of our digital-privacy expectations as “contextual integrity”. When we reveal information in one context, we trust that it won’t pop up to surprise us in another.

In many European countries, the salary gap between CEOs and their employees is less than half of what it is in the United States. “They have stronger labor unions over there, which makes a difference,” says Dyson Professor Steven Kyle. “Also, when you have socialists governing, they’re going to jump up and down about these things. And, obviously, we don’t have that.”

Lately, there’s been a critical mass of companies getting into hospitality. “Hotel brands are not overbuilt, but under-demolished,” says Chekitan Dev, professor of marketing at the Hotel School.

Behavioral economist, David Just explains the potential shortcomings in using electronic technology for cooking and comments on how “cookbooks are better at defining themselves around a theme.”

Director of labor education research, Kate Bronfenbrenner, comments on the House race in Wisconsin between two Democrats with close ties to labor unions.

Op-ed by psychology professor, Melissa J. Ferguson, and doctoral student, Stav Atir, on their research showing that men are more likely than women to be referred to by their last-name only — which has implications for eminence, fame, and professional opportunities.