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A high-salt diet produces dementia in mice

A high-salt diet reduces resting blood flow to the brain and causes dementia in mice, according to a new Weill Cornell Medicine study.

Cornell artists win global soil painting competition

A soil painting created by Cornellians won first prize in the university category of a global soil painting competition.

Christopher Dunn to chair new national conservation group

Christopher Dunn, executive director of the Cornell Botanic Gardens, will be the inaugural chair of the new U.S. National Committee of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

Gifts create new Arts and Sciences professorships

Four new alumni gifts have helped the College of Arts and Sciences create three new professorships and fund a new graduate student position.

U of Puerto Rico students prep to take refuge at Cornell

As students from Universidad de Puerto Rico are getting ready to arrive by mid-January, the campus community is gearing up to give them a warm welcome.

Lynden Archer to lead Cornell Energy Systems Institute

Lynden Archer, professor of chemical and biolomolecular engineering, is the new director of the Cornell Energy Systems Institute.

Engineers create new architecture for vaporizable electronics

Engineers have demonstrated a new method to remotely vaporize electronics, giving devices and data the ability to vanish.

The frozen winter of our web content

A 2012 Scientific American article, “The Winters of Our Discontent,” by professor Chuck Greene has enjoyed a wintry revival.

Essentials

New website celebrates Cornell’s diversity

Cornell’s new Diversity and Inclusion website compiles diversity initiatives and policies, cultural organizations and events.

Mark Veich appointed vice provost for external affairs at Weill Cornell Medicine

Mark Veich has been appointed vice provost for external affairs at Weill Cornell Medicine, effective Feb. 12.

Researchers identify immune cells that keep gut fungi under control

Immune cells that process food and bacterial antigens in the intestines control the intestinal population of fungi, according to a new study.

Cornell extends partnership with Public Prep in NYC

Cornell University has extended its partnership to incorporate computer science instruction and opportunities for STEM engagement with Public Prep, a New York City nonprofit network.