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Compound hastens sexual maturity, and death, in worms

Researchers from Boyce Thompson Institute have discovered a natural compound that causes soil roundworms to mature faster and die earlier, which could inform studies of human development and aging.

Grants create engagement opportunities for students

The Office of Engagement Initiatives has awarded $1,307,580 in Engaged Curriculum Grants to 25 teams of faculty and community partners that are integrating community engagement into majors and minors across the university.

You butter believe it: Low-calorie spread made mostly of water

Cornell food scientists have created a new dreamy, creamy – and very low calorie – spread for your morning toast.

Cornell partners with Purdue on global food safety

Cornell is teaming with Purdue University to establish the first Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Safety, which aims to solve some of the world’s greatest challenges in agriculture and food insecurity.

Deadly protein duo reveals new drug targets for viral diseases

Two lethal viruses, Nipah and Hendra, may be more potent when their proteins are combined, according to new research from Hector Aguilar-Carreno, associate professor of microbiology and immunology.

Partnership will advance food safety research in China

Cornell and China’s Hebei Qimei Agriculture Science and Technology Co. Ltd., have agreed to collaborate on microbial food safety research, via a $2.5 million grant from the Walmart Foundation.

For Prabhu Pingali, India’s malnutrition puzzle is personal

Prabhu Pingali, founder of the Tata-Cornell Institute for Agriculture and Nutrition, is making progress in his quest to discover why 15% of Indians – nearly 200 million people – remain malnourished.

Groundwater policies fire up air pollution in northwest India

A measure to conserve groundwater in northwestern India has led to unexpected consequences: Added air pollution in an area already beset by haze and smog.

Link found between gut bacteria, successful joint replacement

Having healthy gut flora – the trillions of bacteria housed in our intestines – could lower the risk of infection following knee and hip replacement surgeries, while an unhealthy intestinal flora may increase the risk of infection.