Asteroid that killed dinosaurs may have sped up bird evolution

A new study considers whether the mass extinction that killed off the dinosaurs led to a temporary acceleration in the rate of genetic evolution among its avian survivors.

Sea salts bring potentially harmful mold to the table, researchers find

Sea salts inspire talk of terroir, texture and provenance. Now there’s evidence that they can also be sources of spoilage molds.

Cornell scientist tapped to preserve elm trees on the National Mall

A team of Cornell scientists, led by Nina Bassuk, professor in the Horticulture Section of the School of Integrative Plant Science, is working to preserve the elms on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., for generations to come.

Black-and-white proof: Single genes control color, stripes in butterfly wings

Two papers prove for the first time how single master genes – one for colors and iridescence and the other for stripe patterns – control these complex traits in butterfly wings.

Veterinary students travel the world for planetary health

College of Veterinary Medicine students traveled to destinations around the world last summer for clinical research that advances planetary health.

3-D analysis of dog fossils sheds light on domestication debate

In an effort to settle the debate about the origin of dog domestication, a technique that uses 3-D scans of fossils is helping researchers determine the difference between dogs and wolves.

Faculty train to use new technologies to share their research widely

Knowledge Matters, a workshop series designed for Cornell faculty members and academic staff, is helping participants translate their research into a variety of digital media platforms.

Epigenetic code plays a role in acute myeloid leukemia

Errors in the regulation of gene expression may contribute to the development of a common form of blood cancer and point to potential treatment strategies.

Oak wilt found in six new New York locations

Cornell scientists in partnership with state agencies identified oak wilt, a devastating pathogenic fungus that kills oak trees, in four towns on Long Island, in Brooklyn and in Canandaigua.