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Tech used to thwart shoplifters could help keep buildings safe

Cornell engineers have created a radio frequency identification system capable of taking measurements at widths thinner than a human hair, opening potential applications ranging from building safety to improved robotics. 

Podcast explores role of identity in youth engagement

The latest edition of the Cornell Cooperative Extension’s “Extension Out Loud” podcast features human development associate professor Anthony Burrow discussing the importance of purpose for youth.

Digital Ag Hackathon tackles pressing agricultural problems

Cornell’s first Digital Agriculture Hackathon saw students from a variety of disciplines come together to develop ways of addressing some of the world’s most pressing agricultural challenges.

Upstate beef farm honored for efforts to keep NYC water clean

Thunder View Farms, a Catskill-region Angus beef operation founded and run by Cornell graduates, has been honored by the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association for its efforts at keeping water that flows to New York City safe.

New CRISPR technique for studying gene function developed

A new study reports on a robust and efficient new method – using the gene editing technology CRISPR-Cas9 – for studying gene function.

Robot biomimics animals leaping from water

By studying the mechanics needed for tiny one-millimeter copepods to jump out of water, scientists could build robots that use similar jumping techniques for practical purposes.

Tackling cancer biology research across colleges and campuses

Richard Cerione, the Goldwin Smith Professor of pharmacology and chemical biology, and Claudia Fischbach, professor of biomedical engineering, discuss their collaborative research on cancer biology – the metabolic changes required for cancer development and cancer cells' interactions with other cells.

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Biochar soaks up ammonia pollution, study shows

A Cornell-led study supported by the Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future shows that biochar has great potential as a fertilizer because of its ability to soak up nitrogen, and its method for doing so.

Experts highlight NYS invasive species research in D.C.

Mark Whitmore, extension associate in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, briefed congressional staffers on an invasive species threatening hemlock trees and ways to combat it.