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Smart irrigation model predicts rainfall to conserve water

A predictive model combining information about plant physiology, real-time soil conditions and weather forecasts can save 40% of the water consumed by traditional irrigation strategies, according to new Cornell research.

Nice catch: Cornell scientists net 139-pound Oneida Lake sturgeon

Researchers from the Cornell Biological Field Station, caught, tagged and released a 139-pound lake sturgeon – possibly the largest fish ever caught on that lake.

4-H’ers prepare ‘rusty’ experiment for space station

Five students from Watertown’s Wiley Intermediate School 4-H after-school program will watch their experiment soar from Cape Canaveral on July 21 to the International Space Station. 

Do ladybugs help your garden grow? Depends on surroundings

A new study of cabbage crops in New York reports for the first time that the effectiveness of releasing natural enemies to combat pests depends on the landscape surrounding the field.

Audio storytelling workshop to train journalists

On July 11-12, 10 journalists will descend on The Białowieża Forest, where they are taking part in an audio storytelling workshop, to report on the role climate change is playing in the increasing infestations of bark beetles, a forest pest.

New imaging method aids in water decontamination

A breakthrough imaging technique developed by Cornell researchers shows promise in decontaminating water by yielding surprising and important information about catalyst particles that can’t be obtained any other way.

Four Cornell faculty win White House early career awards

The White House has recognized Cornell faculty members – Thomas Hartman, Jenny Kao-Kniffin, Kin Fai Mak and Rebecca Slayton – with Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers.

USDA awards $1.8M to Cornell for packaging, beverage concentrate research

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture has awarded $1.8 million to two Cornell food science research projects.

Cornell instruments gather radio ‘disruption’ data in ionosphere

Two NASA sounding rockets – with Cornell-built instruments – soared into the night heavens above the Marshall Islands June 19 to study the ionosphere.