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U.S. economy’s current growth will peak in 2019

The U.S. economy has been on a long, slow upward trend for eight years, but a Cornell economist predicts that – like all good things – the steady growth will soon come to an end, likely by the end of the year.

Well-being Fair teaches skills, highlights Cornell resources

To promote the idea that working hard and being well go hand in hand, the Cornell SC Johnson College of Business held its first Well-being Fair on Jan. 11.

Pawprint

Cornell campus prepares for major winter storm

The National Weather Service has forecast a major winter storm that will likely start near midday on Saturday, Jan. 19, and end before evening on Sunday, Jan. 20.

Essentials

Apply for 2019 Digitization Grants

Cornell University Library’s digitization grants program invites proposals from faculty and graduate students in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Ken Clarke to discuss MLK on ‘All Things Equal’ Jan. 21

Rev. Kenneth Clarke, director of the Tompkins County Office of Human Rights, will discuss two iconic speeches by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy on a special Martin Luther King Jr. Day edition of “All Things Equal” Jan. 21.

Essentials

Things to Do, Jan. 18-25, 2019

Events this week include new films at Cornell Cinema; a display of Martin Luther King's work with the labor movement; an early 20th-century piano festival and an exhibit from a local biodiversity survey.

Muse, Shaw win Nathan Award for Dramatic Criticism

John H. Muse of the University of Chicago and arts journalist Helen Shaw have won the 2017-18 George Jean Nathan Award for Dramatic Criticism, administered by Cornell’s Department of English.

Margaret Martonosi ’86 visits as A.D. White Professor-at-Large

Computer scientist Margaret Martonosi '86 will interact with students and faculty Jan. 22-26 as an Andrew Dickson White Professor-at-Large.

Hands-on, intensive parenting is best, most parents say

Parents may struggle to meet the ideal of intensive parenting – especially if they have low incomes and education levels, according to a new study by Patrick Ishizuka.