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Three at Cornell receive NEH grants

Sturt Manning, Nancy Green and Nicole Milano have received grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities for field research, cultural heritage and preservation projects.

Lecturer to be featured in PBS documentary

The PBS documentary series “The Future of America’s Past” features Elissa Sampson, lecturer in the Jewish Studies Program, in the episode about New York City’s Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire.

Essentials

CALS strengthens NYC connections with new grant projects

Three collaborative New York City-based projects, designed to inspire cross-campus research partnerships, have been awarded grant funding totaling approximately $500,000 from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

Weslock, Beck are ILR’s 2020 Groat, Alpern award winners

The ILR School’s Groat and Alpern award winners, Kathleen Weslock, M.S. ’83 and Barry Beck ’90, will be honored during a celebration event April 23, 2020, at the Pierre Hotel in New York.

White Coat Ceremony sends Class of ’23 on to medical school

Weill Cornell Medicine’s 106-member Class of 2023 was sent off to medical school Aug. 20 with the annual White Coat Ceremony that officially marks the beginning of graduates’ medical education. 

New tools help detect digital domestic abuse

A new clinical model developed by Cornell Tech researchers aims to respond systematically and effectively to the growing array of digital threats against victims of intimate partner violence.

Inaugural class graduates from health care leadership program

The Executive M.B.A./M.S. in Healthcare Leadership, which combines a master’s from the Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences with an MBA from the Johnson school, graduated its inaugural class in May.

Jacobs Technion-Cornell Institute names first endowed professor

Ari Juels, a professor of computer science at the Jacobs Technion-Cornell Institute at Cornell Tech, has been named the Weill Family Foundation and Joan and Sanford I. Weill Professor – the first endowed professorship at the institute.

How many taxis can scan a city? Fewer than you’d think

Just 10 taxis equipped with mobile sensors can survey a third of Manhattan’s streets in a day, inexpensively gathering valuable data about factors such as air quality, street conditions and bridge stability to provide an accurate and timely snapshot of a city’s health, according to a new study including a Cornell researcher.