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Toxic pollen from widely planted, genetically modified corn can kill monarch butterflies, Cornell study shows

An increasingly popular commercial corn, genetically engineered to produce a bacterial toxin to protect against corn pests, has an unwanted side effect: Its pollen kills monarch butterfly larvae in laboratory tests, according to a report by Cornell University researchers.

Simple change in cattle diets could cut E. coli infection

A simple change in cattle diets in the days before slaughter may reduce the risk of Escherichia coli (E. coli) infections in humans, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Cornell University microbiologists have discovered.

Food bacteria-spice survey shows why some cultures like it hot

Humans' use of antimicrobial spices developed in parallel with food-spoilage microorganisms, Cornell University biologists have demonstrated in a international survey of spice use in cooking. (March 4, 1998)

Cornell scientists help develop the Vegetarian Diet Pyramid

To offer a healthful alternative to the 1992 U.S. Food Guide Pyramid, Cornell University and Harvard University researchers have teamed up with other experts in unveiling an official Vegetarian Diet Pyramid. (Jan. 7, 1998)

Salmonellosis (Public Health Concerns for the Farm Family and Staff)

Two fact sheets about salmonellosis. What is salmonellosis? How is it spread? Conditions under which salmonella survive in the environment? What are the symptoms of salmonella infection in humans?

U.S. could feed 800 million people with grain that livestock eat, Cornell ecologist advises animal scientists

From one ecologist's perspective, the American system of farming grain-fed livestock consumes resources far out of proportion to the yield, accelerates soil erosion, affects world food supply and will be changing in the future.

Cornell class project could bloom into an industry

What started as a casual screening of raspberry varieties in the greenhouse grew into a graduate student class project and may soon blossom into a large-scale, full-fledged agricultural industry for New York: fresh, sweet raspberries in winter.

Cornell heads up international effort to relieve poverty in sub-Saharan Africa

Sub-Saharan Africa is the only region in the world where poverty keeps getting worse, a Cornell economist says. His new mission: to head up a major, collaborative research effort with a strong focus on policy that will have a major impact on improving the lives of millions of poor Africans.

Cornell program helps keep New York-produced eggs free from Salmonella

Fearful that a little eggnog or Caesar salad dressing might send you to bed with a Salmonella-related illness? The chances are slight, but they’re even slimmer if your eggs are produced in New York, thanks to the Salmonella Control Program conducted by the Unit of Avian Medicine at Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine.