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Protein finding could inform new type 2 diabetes treatment

Researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian have discovered a function of the protein adipsin that could help inform new treatments for type 2 diabetes. 

Sled dogs lead the way in quest to slow aging

A $4.2 million project at Cornell focused on 100 Alaskan sled dogs, former athletes past their glory days, is part of a quest for one of the holy grails of medicine: how to slow aging.

Moonbeam adds a big bang of flavor to Galaxy tomatoes

Fresh from Cornell AgriTech, the newest grape tomato – Moonbeam – has joined a constellation of heirloom-style tomatoes in the 2020 High Mowing Organic Seeds catalog Nov. 1.

Scientists identify protein that promotes brain metastasis

A protein that breast, lung and other cancers use to promote their spread – or metastasis – to the brain, has been identified by a team led by Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian investigators.

Researchers explore the ‘gist’ of doctor-patient communication

Professors Holly Prigerson and Valerie Reyna have combined forces to study end-of-life communication between patients and their physicians and clinicians, with the goal of improved prognostic understanding and decision-making and, ultimately, better end-of-life decisions.

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NIH grant will fund non-pharmacological pain research

A team of Cornell researchers and scientists focused on pain management has received a five-year, $3 million grant from the National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health.

Fresh produce earns ‘halo effect’ under new GMO-labeling laws

Consumers were more willing to buy unlabeled produce after being shown food tagged as “genetically modified” in a new Cornell study that comes two months before a new federal food-labeling law goes into effect.

Study links high-salt diet and cognitive impairment

A high-salt diet may impair cognitive function by causing a deficiency of nitric oxide, which is vital for maintaining vascular health in the brain, according to a new study from Weill Cornell Medicine.

Mapping cancer’s drug resistance could improve treatment

Powerful lab and computational techniques developed by scientists at Weill Cornell Medicine and two other centers will enable scientists to map tumors’ ability to develop resistance to drugs.