Symposium addresses role of truth in universities, society

An academic symposium, “Universities and the Search for Truth,” held Aug. 24 in Bailey Hall, was part of the celebrations of Martha E. Pollack’s inauguration as Cornell’s 14th president.

Annual mammography starting at 40 saves more lives

Weill Cornell Medicine investigators have found that annual mammograms for women beginning at age 40 prevent the greatest number of breast cancer deaths.

Study: Jumping gene steals bacterial ‘gene-editing’ system

A Cornell study describes for the first-time evidence of ‘jumping genes’ adopting a bacterial immune mechanism for transferring genetic material between bacteria and across bacterial species.

White Coat ceremony launches students’ careers in medicine

Weill Cornell Medical College's Class of 2021 as received their short white coats during the institution's annual White Coat Ceremony Aug. 15. officially marking the beginning of their medical education.

Genomic insights reveal the surprising journey of the apple

Researchers at the Cornell-affiliated Boyce Thompson Institute have excavated the mysteries of the apple's evolutionary history.

Institute focuses on global nutrition policy impact

The Division of Nutrition is hosting the 4th annual WHO/Cochrane/Cornell University Summer Institute for Systematic Reviews in Nutrition for Global Policy Making July 24 to Aug. 4.

Cornell trains gender-responsive researchers in Africa

Cornell's "Gender Responsive Cereal Grains Breeding" is being held at Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda, Aug. 7-16.

Mechanisms found to explain atypical femoral fractures

A research team led by Eve Donnelly, assistant professor in materials science and engineering, has published a study regarding a dangerous side effect of long-term use of bisphosphonates to treat osteoporosis.

Immune cells may be key to better allergy, infection therapies

By learning how an immune cell called Tr1 works in the body, researchers hope to one day harness the cells to better treat allergies and infections, according to new Cornell research.