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Study: Tug at heartstrings with big stats, human stories

Organizations can persuade people to pay attention to society’s problems by making emotional appeals, with eye-catching statistics and human interest stories, according to a new study co-written by Adam Seth Levine.

In competition, people get discouraged by competent robots

A Cornell-led team has found that when robots are beating humans in contests for cash prizes, people consider themselves less competent and expend slightly less effort – and they tend to dislike the robots, too.

Study: Nearly half of Americans have had a family member jailed, imprisoned

In a groundbreaking study illuminating the extensive scope of mass incarceration in the U.S., nearly 1 in 2 Americans have had a member of their immediate family spend time in jail or prison – a far higher figure than previously estimated.

ILR study: Workplace sexual harassment impacts 1 in 10 in NY

A study by the ILR School’s Worker Institute reveals that more than 1 in 10 New Yorkers, including 12.2 percent of women, experience quid pro quo workplace sexual harassment.

New minor track focuses on inequities in health

A new option for study within the inequality studies minor gives students a chance to explore the social causes and consequences of inequities as they relate to health.

Social scientists take on data-driven discrimination

Big data, machine learning and digital surveillance have the potential to create racial and social inequalities – and make existing discrimination even worse, according to a team of Cornell scientists addressing the problem.

Active Learning Initiative funds nine projects

Innovative projects to enhance undergraduate teaching and learning in nine departments have received funding administered by Cornell’s Active Learning Initiative.

Living arrangements of ‘Dreamers’ are more complex, less stable, study shows

Unauthorized Mexican and Central American immigrants who came to the United States as children or teens live in more complex and less stable households than their documented or native-born counterparts, according to a new study from Cornell researchers.

People admit they trust news stories that contradict their views – for a price

Researchers at Cornell Tech found that people are far more likely to say they believe news stories that align with their own political views no matter what outlet they’re from. But when offered a cash bonus for accuracy, participants were more likely to trust the news stories that countered their views.