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NYC conference to examine challenges posed by the ‘gig economy’

The "gig economy" will be explored in an April 27-28 conference in New York City organized by The Worker Institute at Cornell’s ILR School.

Analysis finds strong consensus on effectiveness of gender transition treatment

A new data analysis has found strong consensus that undergoing gender transition can improve transgender well-being.

Quality of Medicaid varies as a result of public policy

A new book by Jamila Michener, “Fragmented Democracy: Medicaid, Federalism and Unequal Politics,” finds unequal application of Medicaid undermines democracy.

Inequality partnership moves to Cornell

Cornell’s Center for the Study of Inequality in the College of Arts and Sciences has announced a new partnership with the What We Know Project.

Student business owners vie for campuswide prize

Thirteen student companies pitched their business ideas during the Student Business of the Year competition finals March 28 at eHub Collegetown.

Influencing entitled people: Reframe requests, researchers say

ILR School researcher Emily Zitek found that entitled people do not follow instructions because they would rather take a loss themselves than agree to something unfair.

Humphreys: On social media, what’s new actually isn't

In her new book, communication professor Lee Humphreys shows how pocket diaries, photo albums and baby books are the predigital precursors of today’s digital and mobile platforms for posting text and images.

Faculty report offers ideas for structure of social sciences at Cornell

A faculty committee charged with exploring opportunities to position the social sciences at Cornell for excellence in 10 to 15 years has issued a report that will serve as the basis for campuswide discussion over the coming months.

So close, yet so far: Making climate impacts feel close by may not inspire action

Upending the conventional thinking in climate change communication, Jonathon Schuldt finds when people say faraway climate impacts feel geographically nearby, they don’t necessarily support policies that would stop them.