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Cornell Board of Trustees to meet in New York City Jan. 27-29

The Cornell University Board of Trustees will hold its first meeting of 2000 at the Weill Medical College of Cornell University in New York City, Jan. 27 through Jan. 29.

The full board will meet in open session from 1:45 to 3:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 28, and in closed session Saturday, Jan. 29, from 9 to 11:45 a.m. in the Joan and Sanford I. Weill Education Center in the medical college's Harkness Medical Research Building, 1300 York Ave. Among topics of discussion will be a report from Cornell President Hunter Rawlings. The board is expected to approve 2000-01 tuition rates for the endowed colleges.

In addition to the full board meetings, the following committees with open sessions will meet on Thursday, Jan. 27, or Friday, Jan. 28:

  • The Buildings and Properties Committee will meet at 2 p.m. Thursday in Room A-126 to review the status of a number of construction and renovation projects.

The committee will receive a report on the recently completed construction of an addition to Mann Library, which will be opened this semester. The $25.6 million project provides an additional 112,500 square feet of space for the library that serves the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of Human Ecology.

  • The Audit Committee will have an open session at the beginning of its meeting at 6:30 p.m. Thursday in Whitney 117. The committee's annual report will be reviewed and a Year 2000 update will be presented.
  • The Land Grant and Statutory College Affairs Committee will meet at 3:30 p.m. Friday in Whitney 117. Among items to be discussed at this open meeting are state relationships and the federal and state financial climate."
  • The Committee on Academic Affairs and Campus Life will meet at 4 p.m. Thursday in Room A-126, and will consider whether to establish a graduate degree program in atmospheric science.
  • "Allergies to cats aren't caused by cat fur but rather by allergen proteins in the cat's saliva. Every time a cat grooms itself -- even a hairless breed like a Sphynx -- it spreads the allergens over its body. The allergens are carried through the air on tiny particles of dander. Meticulous housekeeping can help somewhat, but no breed of cat is truly allergy-proof."

The Committee on Academic Affairs and Campus Life will meet at 4 p.m. Thursday in Room A-126, and will consider whether to establish a graduate degree program in atmospheric science.

Tickets for the board of trustees meeting may be obtained by the general public on a first-come, first-served basis beginning Tuesday, Jan. 25, at the Information and Referral Center in Day Hall, Ithaca.

 

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