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The World Economic Forum’s Strategic Intelligence website has tapped Nicholas Mulder, assistant professor of history, to share his expertise in geo-economics.

In “Four Threats,” a new book co-authored by government professor Suzanne Mettler, the authors not only assert that history repeats itself – they also identify the underlying causes of democracy destabilization.

In flood-prone areas of the Hudson River valley in New York state, census areas with more white and affluent home owners tend to file a higher percentage of flood insurance claims than lower-income, minority residents, according to a new study. 

Despite weak constitutional checks and balances, public opinion represents a powerful check on presidents’ willingness to act unilaterally, according to a new book co-authored by Douglas Kriner.

Lee Teng-hui, Ph.D. ’68, the first popularly elected president of Taiwan, who helped guide the island toward prosperity and democracy, died July 30 in Taipei. He was 97.

Virtual events at Cornell include a lecture on challenges endangering freshwater fish, an conference on worker and community concerns in safely returning to work in New York City, an international linguistics meeting and an introduction to religious and spiritual life on campus.

“Systemic Racism and Health Equity,” a webinar hosted July 23 by the Cornell Center for Health Equity, featured insights from three expert panelists and moderator Jamila Michener, associate professor of government and center co-director.

Cornell’s McNair Scholars shared their stories of academic excellence July 21-24, as they paid virtual visits to the offices of U.S. senators and representatives to advocate for more higher-education funding for first-generation and low-income students.

The High Road Fellowship summer program was unable to send students to western New York this year due to the pandemic, but the ILR Buffalo Co-Lab modified its programming to bring Buffalo to its 23 fellows.

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