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When developers seem fair, new tech looks less risky

When evaluating the risks of new technology, people consider whether developers behave fairly, new Cornell research has found.

‘One Health’ a key focus of COVID-19 Summit

The “One Health” approach is perfectly suited to tackling the COVID-19 pandemic, the most serious public health crisis in recent history, Cornell researchers said during the university’s COVID-19 Summit, a virtual event held Nov. 4-5.

Voters anxious ahead of election, students’ national poll finds

After learning the theory and methodology behind public opinion polls, undergraduates in “Taking America’s Pulse” surveyed a nationally representative sample of more than 1,100 Americans on a wide range of topics.

Social scientists win award for rural population studies

Cornell social scientists were part of a team that won the National Excellence in Multistate Research Award from the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities and the United States Department of Agriculture.

Psychological ownership improves care of public parks, lakes

Marketing strategies that boost feelings of psychological ownership can increase people's willingness to clean up trash, donate money and volunteer at public parks, according to research co-authored by Suzanne Shu, professor of marketing.

Wilkerson: US must reckon with ‘long shadow’ of caste system

Isabel Wilkerson, journalist and author of “Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents,” on Oct. 21 delivered the Cornell Center for Social Sciences’ annual Distinguished Lecture in the Social Sciences.

Entry isn’t easy, but immigrants face few barriers in NYC tech

Cornell researchers surveyed 325 Manhattan and Brooklyn tech firms in 2015 and found that 45% of the CEOs were first- or second-generation immigrants.

Efficacy, politics influence public trust in COVID-19 vaccine

In surveys of nearly 2,000 American adults, barely half said they would be willing to take a hypothetical vaccine with an efficacy, or effectiveness, of 50% – the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s minimum threshold for a COVID-19 vaccine.

Religion: less ‘opiate,’ more suppressant, study finds

Rather than making people less political, religion shapes people’s political ideas, suppressing important group differences and progressive political positions, according to sociologist Landon Schnabel.