How to get people to follow the rules: lessons from the pandemic’s ‘great experiment’

When a deadly global pandemic broke out, compliance — the act of following rules — became critical. Yet many people didn’t adhere to the rules. Professor John, from the Cornell Law School, explains how getting people to work together and follow rules takes careful thought and planning, and that compliance inside businesses and organizations is essential to accomplishing just about anything.  

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Women resent compliments about communality at work

When women and men are faced with positive gendered stereotypes, women experience more frustration and less motivation to comply with the expectation than men, according to new research.

Students tackle community projects in moral psychology course

Students in a new moral psychology class spent the semester working with local non-profits to tackle issues from migrant family justice to food insecurity to sustainable agriculture.

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Harrison College Scholars tackle interdisciplinary research projects

This year’s graduating class of Robert S. Harrison College Scholars presented their final theses during a daylong event May 7 in Goldwin Smith Hall.

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Arts and Sciences faculty honored for teaching, advising excellence

"These faculty members and graduate teaching assistants have made tremendous contributions for the benefit of our students, guiding their educational paths and molding their experiences."

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New Frontier Grants push boundaries in A&S research

The College of Arts and Sciences awarded $1.25 million in grants to faculty members pursuing critical developments in areas ranging from quantum materials to sustainable technologies.

Same-race friends help teens connect to school

New Cornell psychology research highlights the power of peers to influence adolescents’ sense of belonging in diverse schools.

Online retail images reveal skin tone discrepancies

A Cornell study found that still images of models in online retail ads had statistically lighter skin tones than those in videos of the same product and model. They also found evidence of “tokenism” – one model who was considerably darker-skinned than the others.

Undergraduate psychology conference to feature diverse research

Thirty-five students will present on topics from implicit bias in person perceptions to early-life adversity in prairie voles and more.

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