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New Cornell sugarhouse sweetens NY’s maple industry

The Cornell Maple Program has opened an advanced, New York state-funded maple research laboratory, an upgrade that will enable research on making high-quality syrup, and new and existing maple products – all at commercial scales.

Spotted lanternfly spreading in New York state

The spotted lanternfly – an invasive, destructive pest with a wide range of hosts including grapes, apples, hops, maple and walnut – has spread to a growing number of counties in New York state.

Hemp goes ‘hot’ due to genetics, not environmental stress

A new Cornell study debunks misinformation on websites and in news articles that claim that environmental or biological stresses – such as flooding or disease – cause an increase in THC production in hemp plants.

Indian women’s nutrition suffered during COVID-19 lockdown

The 2020 nationwide lockdown India imposed in response to the COVID-19 pandemic caused disruptions that negatively impacted women’s nutrition, according to a new study from the Tata-Cornell Institute for Agriculture and Nutrition.

New insights on flowering could boost cassava crops

Two new publications examining cassava flowering reveal insights into the genetic and environmental factors underpinning one of the world’s most critical food security crops.

Four Specialists Join New York Sea Grant

Four new extension specialists have joined New York Sea Grant (NYSG) in its mission of “Bringing Science to the Shore” as part of a collaborative program between Cornell and the State University of New York.

Around Cornell

Northwest heat wave ‘should not have been possible’

After stifling temperatures parked over the Pacific Northwest in late June, scientists – including Cornell’s Flavio Lehner – said climate change triggered it.

Farm marketing success linked to natural, cultural assets

Farmers markets and roadside stands are more successful in communities with more nonprofits, social enterprises and creative industries, according to a new study.

To better protect food, place rodent traps near warmth, shelter

Food distribution centers can protect the food supply more effectively by setting traps near features that attract rodents, rather than a set distance apart, a new Cornell-led study found.