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After pandemic first year, white coats for Class of 2024

On Sept. 24, after a year highlighted by so many virtual events, the Class of 2024 finally celebrated their medical school journey with a White Coat Ceremony – hosted in-person.

Community Response Team supports students in distress

Students living on campus have a new resource for support when they are experiencing distress, with the launch of the university’s Community Response Team at the start of this semester.

Booster shots: What you need to know

In this Q&A, Dr. Roy Gulick of Weill Cornell Medicine breaks down the science underlying booster shots of COVID-19 vaccines and answers some frequently asked questions.

States That Prioritized Access to Water at Height of Pandemic Saved Lives

Water shutoffs for non-payment are a constant threat for millions of Americans in any given year. That risk was a deadly one during the pandemic, with access to clean water for handwashing and sanitation a proven way to reduce the spread of COVID-19. The dozens of states that implemented moratoria on water shutoffs to protect vulnerable citizens reported better public health outcomes, according to a new Cornell study.

Around Cornell

‘More inspired than ever:’ Cornell students start their journeys in law, med school

Despite the pandemic, Cornell students successfully navigated the process of applying to medical and law schools and are headed to some of the country’s top professional schools this fall.

Around Cornell

Micro-robots propelled by air bubbles and ultrasound

Cornell researchers created cell-size robots that can be powered and steered by ultrasound waves. Despite their tiny size, these micro-robotic swimmers could be a formidable new tool for targeted drug delivery.

Center for Bright Beams awarded $22M in grant renewal

A collaboration of researchers led by Cornell has been awarded $22.5 million from the National Science Foundation to continue gaining the fundamental understanding needed to transform the brightness of electron beams available to science, medicine and industry.

Scientists find new way to reverse immune suppression in tumors

Malignant tumors can enhance their ability to survive and spread by suppressing antitumor immune cells in their vicinity, but a new study has uncovered a way to counter this effect.

NIH-funded research to address rising male infertility

Paula Cohen, associate vice provost for life sciences, is leading an eight-year, $8 million, multi-institution grant to untangle the complex genetic rulebook for how sperm develops.