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AI helps shrink Amazon dams’ greenhouse gas emissions

A Cornell-led team has developed a computational model that uses artificial intelligence to find the most sustainable configurations of hydropower dam sites in the Amazon basin.

Cornell CIS to celebrate 20 years of impact Oct. 2-3

To celebrate its 20th anniversary, the Faculty of Computing and Information Science will host an academic symposium Oct. 2-3 exploring the history and future of computing at Cornell and around the world.

Students to converge on campus for Big Red Hacks

Around 500 students from across the country will gather on campus Sept. 20-22 for Big Red Hacks, Cornell’s oldest and largest student-run hackathon.

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Research gives robots a second chance at first impressions

A Cornell-led team was recently awarded a $2.5 million grant from the Office of Naval Research to develop a computational model of how humans form and update their memories of robots.

AI analysis gives guidance to crisis counselors

Computing and Information Science scholars combed through more than 1 million anonymized texts from nearly 3,500 crisis counselors to better understand how job experience affects counselor language use.

Grants create engagement opportunities for students

The Office of Engagement Initiatives has awarded $1,307,580 in Engaged Curriculum Grants to 25 teams of faculty and community partners that are integrating community engagement into majors and minors across the university.

Certificate program develops skills in machine learning

Cornell has launched an online certificate program in machine learning, available through eCornell, to teach the skills programmers, developers and others need to be successful in this rapidly expanding field.

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New tools help detect digital domestic abuse

A new clinical model developed by Cornell Tech researchers aims to respond systematically and effectively to the growing array of digital threats against victims of intimate partner violence.

Study finds racial bias in tweets flagged as hate speech

Tweets believed to be written by African Americans are much more likely to be tagged as hate speech than tweets associated with whites, according to a Cornell study analyzing five collections of Twitter data marked for abusive language.