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Lee Teng-hui, Ph.D. ’68, the first popularly elected president of Taiwan, who helped guide the island toward prosperity and democracy, died July 30 in Taipei. He was 97.

Jonathan Culler, the Class of 1916 Professor of English and Comparative Literature, has been elected to membership in the British Academy.

Small farms in Zambia that use the latest hybrid seed for maize, help reduce deforestation and tackle climate change in a new Cornell study.

Two Lab of Ornithology staff members created a science project on birds with community leaders, teachers and students in the Peruvian Amazon. The result? A flowering of community interest beyond anything they could have imagined.

In “Racism and the Future of Memorials,” a July 13 webinar, architects and scholars discussed Confederate monuments, transitional justice memorials and the remnants of black heritage in Harlem.

A new podcast on “Unsettled Monuments, Unsettling Heritage,” launched in the spring, showcases the work of the Public Life fellowship group, part of the humanities-focused Radical Collaboration initiative.

Research from the Tata-Cornell Institute for Agriculture and Nutrition shows that India’s rigorous lockdown has driven up the price of produce, limiting people’s ability to afford a nutritionally diverse diet.

Maps are more than two-dimensional representations of three-dimensional terrain – they are also powerful political tools to control territory, as sociologist Christine Leuenberger explains in her new book.

Cornell’s Southeast Asia Program has received a four-year, $275,000 Luce Foundation grant to strengthen graduate education in the field, working with National Resource Centers across the country.