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Hypersensitive cell sleuth may hold key to functional HIV cure

Scientists at the College of Veterinary Medicine developed a new technology for studying viruses directly in their host cells, opening the door to finding a functional cure for HIV – and a possible tool in the fight against COVID-19.

Study: Air pollution laws aimed at human health also help birds

U.S. pollution regulations meant to protect people from dirty air are also saving North America’s birds, according to a new study conducted by scientists at Cornell and the University of Oregon.

Five faculty members elected AAAS fellows

Five Cornell faculty members have been elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world’s largest general scientific society.

Worm-like, soil-swimming robots to measure crop underworld

A Cornell project funded by two separate three-year grants will develop worm-like, soil-swimming robots to sense and record soil properties, water, the soil microbiome and how roots grow.

Hold still, big cat: Vaccination could save Siberian tigers

New research out of the College of Veterinary Medicine has revealed that vaccination of endangered Siberian tigers is the only practical strategy to protect these big cats from potentially deadly canine distemper virus.

Researchers identify genetics behind deadly oat blight

A multi-institution team co-led by a Cornell researcher has identified the genetic mechanisms that enable the production of a deadly toxin called Victorin – the causal agent for Victoria blight of oats, a disease that wiped out oat crops in the U.S. in the 1940s.

Schwartz research award applications due Dec. 11

Women and underrepresented minority faculty members engaging in life science research have until Dec. 11 to apply for a grant from the Schwartz Research Fund for Women and Other Underrepresented Faculty in the Life Sciences.

NIH extends funding of research into deadly Nipah virus

A Cornell researcher is studying Nipah virus in an effort to understand the basic mechanisms of transmission and infection, which are necessary steps toward vaccine development and other therapies.

Doctoral student contributes to global ocean-predator study

Olivia Graham joined five-dozen scientists on four continents to create a marine biology first: a global map to show where the ocean’s mid-sized predators are most active in a climate-changing world.