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Chickpea snack startup aims to disrupt junk food industry

Antithesis, a Cornell student startup, was recently awarded a $225,000 Small Business Innovation Research Phase I award from the National Science Foundation to develop its chickpea-based snack food.

Insectapalooza 2019 will be bigger and buggier – and free

The Department of Entomology on Oct. 19 will host Insectapalooza, an annual extravaganza that aims to take the “creepy” out of “creepy-crawly.” This year’s event is from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Stocking Hall – and it’s free.

Ag-to-energy farmland use is focus of new $2.4M grant

The USDA and the NSF have awarded a three-year, $2.4 million grant to a team of Cornell researchers who will study how ag-to-energy land-use conversions could impact food production.

Grow-NY Summit to feature food, ag innovations

Biodegradable plastics, drone-powered pollination and revolutionary indoor farming techniques are just a few of the innovations that will be on display at the Grow-NY Food and Ag Summit, Nov. 12-13 at the Rochester Riverside Convention Center.

Disease trends in sea creatures herald oceanic changes

The health of Earth’s oceans is rapidly worsening, and newly published Cornell-led research has examined changes in reported diseases across undersea species at a global scale over a 44-year period.

$1M Walmart Foundation grant to fund Tata-Cornell ag study

The Tata-Cornell Institute for Agriculture and Nutrition has been awarded a $1 million grant from the Walmart Foundation to assess challenges facing small-farm aggregation models in India and Mexico.

African rice farmers test traditions against NY climate

Few farmers attempt to grow rice in the Northeast’s short growing season, but a team of farmers, with the help of Cornell scientists, are experimenting with rice-growing methods to suit New York’s climate.

CCE summer interns extend and explore

Twenty-nine Cornell undergraduates spent their summers working and conducting research in communities across New York state as Cornell Cooperative Extension interns.

Scientists retrace monarch’s toxin-immunity evolution

By editing specialized genes into laboratory fruit flies, scientists have reconstructed evolution and instantly conferred in the flies the same toxin resistance enjoyed by monarch butterflies.