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Seven assistant professors win NSF early career awards

Seven Cornell faculty members have received National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development Awards.

Applications open for CIS summer diversity programs

Applications are now open for two all-expenses-paid summer workshops aimed at encouraging underrepresented minorities to consider careers in academic research.

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Ginsparg, Ph.D. ’81, arXiv founder, receives physics award

Paul Ginsparg, Ph.D. ’81, professor of physics and information science, is the recipient of the American Institute of Physics 2020 Karl Taylor Compton Medal for Leadership in Physics.

Live webcast to explore pros, cons of machine learning

Kilian Weinberger, CIS associate professor, will present a live webcast, “Machine Learning: Advancements, Opportunities and Dangers,” Jan. 9 at 1 p.m. The event will be hosted by eCornell.

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Certificate program teaches Python to working professionals

The new Software Development in Python certificate program, a six-course program offered through eCornell, will enable participants to master the foundational concepts of programming in Python.

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Smart intersections could reduce autonomous car congestion

Cornell researchers developed a first-of-its-kind model to control traffic and intersections in order to increase autonomous car capacity on urban streets, reduce congestion and minimize accidents.

Two computer science faculty named ACM fellows

Kavita Bala, professor and chair of computer science, and Claire Cardie, professor of computer science and of information science, have been named 2019 fellows of the Association for Computing Machinery.

Project adapts basic tech to give voice to patients in Africa

A new system developed by Cornell Tech researchers will allow thousands of patients of community health care workers in rural Africa to use a basic tool on their mobile phones to provide feedback about their care.

Are hiring algorithms fair? They’re too opaque to tell, study finds

New research from a team of Computing and Information Science scholars raises questions about hiring algorithms and the tech companies who develop and use them.