Cornell adds opt-in testing for staff and faculty

The university has announced new testing options for vaccinated faculty and staff.

COVID may trigger hyperglycemia by harming fat cells

According to a new study from researchers at Weill Cornell, COVID-19 may bring high risks of severe disease and death in many patients by disrupting key metabolic signals and thereby triggering hyperglycemia.

Student leads vaccine conversation with surgeon general

On Oct. 4, Jordan Tralins ’23, founder of the COVID Campus Coalition, will moderate a virtual discussion between college students and U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy.

Author: World’s greatest ideas came from interdisciplinary teamwork

The collaborative nature of innovation was one of the key messages author Steven Johnson delivered during a campus visit Sept. 22, as a guest of the Milstein Program in Technology & Humanity.

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After pandemic first year, white coats for Class of 2024

On Sept. 24, after a year highlighted by so many virtual events, the Class of 2024 finally celebrated their medical school journey with a White Coat Ceremony – hosted in-person.

Bird reports rose during lockdowns

Around 80% of bird species examined in a new study were reported in greater numbers in human-altered habitats during pandemic lockdowns, according to new research based on data from the eBird program at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Ithaca campus moving to COVID alert level green

Cornell administrators announced that the university would be changing its COVID-19 alert level back to “New Normal,” citing improved surveillance testing results and the relatively low number of current cases of COVID-19.

Booster shots: What you need to know

In this Q&A, Dr. Roy Gulick of Weill Cornell Medicine breaks down the science underlying booster shots of COVID-19 vaccines and answers some frequently asked questions.

States That Prioritized Access to Water at Height of Pandemic Saved Lives

Water shutoffs for non-payment are a constant threat for millions of Americans in any given year. That risk was a deadly one during the pandemic, with access to clean water for handwashing and sanitation a proven way to reduce the spread of COVID-19. The dozens of states that implemented moratoria on water shutoffs to protect vulnerable citizens reported better public health outcomes, according to a new Cornell study.

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