Skip to main content

Demographics data helps predict NY flood insurance claims

In flood-prone areas of the Hudson River valley in New York state, census areas with more white and affluent home owners tend to file a higher percentage of flood insurance claims than lower-income, minority residents, according to a new study. 

In podcast, outgoing CALS dean reflects, ponders trends

Dean Kathryn Boor is leaving College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. But first, she joins Cornell Cooperative Extension's "Extension Out Loud" podcast to reflect on her decade-long tenure and the evolution of agriculture, research and outreach.

Essentials

Report fosters ag industry climate-change tracking

Cornell’s Art DeGaetano is one of nine scientists to co-author a USDA report to help the nation’s farmers and commercial agricultural managers reduce risk in the face of climate change.

Perovskite mineral supports solar-energy sustainability

When it comes to the future of solar energy cells, say farewell to silicon, and hello to calcium titanium oxide – the compound mineral better known as perovskite.

Rural Humanities initiative to focus on Black lives

The Rural Humanities initiative has chosen “Rural Black Lives” as its theme for 2020-21, and its projects and programming will concentrate on the visibility of Black lives in rural central and western New York state.

High Road fellows work remotely for Buffalo’s benefit

The High Road Fellowship summer program was unable to send students to western New York this year due to the pandemic, but the ILR Buffalo Co-Lab modified its programming to bring Buffalo to its 23 fellows.

Essentials

NYS sanitizer, Cornell’s U-pick guide boost farm success

Even in the coronavirus era, New York’s pick-your-own farms are flourishing – thanks to a new Cornell guide and NYS sanitizer.

Study identifies spread of bee disease via flowers

One in 11 flowers carries disease-causing parasites known to contribute to bee declines, according to a Cornell study that identifies how flowers act as hubs for transmitting diseases to bees and other pollinators.

Scientists track plant diseases riding across globe with dust

A multidisciplinary, Cornell-led team of scientists will study how plant pathogens that travel the globe with dust particles might put crops at risk, especially in places where people struggle to eat.