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Cornell's Department of Food Science has selected two commercial dairies as producing the highest quality milk in New York state. The annual selection is tied to the New York State Milk Quality Improvement Program, sponsored by the New York Milk Promotion Order.

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An increasingly popular commercial corn, genetically engineered to produce a bacterial toxin to protect against corn pests, has an unwanted side effect: Its pollen kills monarch butterfly larvae in laboratory tests, according to a report by Cornell University researchers.

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A simple change in cattle diets in the days before slaughter may reduce the risk of Escherichia coli (E. coli) infections in humans, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Cornell University microbiologists have discovered.

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Representatives from six North Country counties of New York state will meet with legislators, state agency representatives, statewide food and farm organizations, and Cornell specialists in food, farm and nutrition policy Monday and Tuesday, May 18-19, at the Empire State Plaza Convention Center to discuss support for local efforts to improve food production and distribution.

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Humans' use of antimicrobial spices developed in parallel with food-spoilage microorganisms, Cornell University biologists have demonstrated in a international survey of spice use in cooking. (March 4, 1998)

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To offer a healthful alternative to the 1992 U.S. Food Guide Pyramid, Cornell University and Harvard University researchers have teamed up with other experts in unveiling an official Vegetarian Diet Pyramid. (Jan. 7, 1998)

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Two fact sheets about salmonellosis. What is salmonellosis? How is it spread? Conditions under which salmonella survive in the environment? What are the symptoms of salmonella infection in humans?

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From one ecologist's perspective, the American system of farming grain-fed livestock consumes resources far out of proportion to the yield, accelerates soil erosion, affects world food supply and will be changing in the future.

What started as a casual screening of raspberry varieties in the greenhouse grew into a graduate student class project and may soon blossom into a large-scale, full-fledged agricultural industry for New York: fresh, sweet raspberries in winter.