77 years apart, son of early Black law grad seeks his own degree

After decades of success as a doctor who worked alongside world leaders responding to catastrophes, Harry Hazelwood III – now in his late 60s – is seeking a master’s degree from Cornell Law School.

Milstein students spend summer producing, questioning, exploring

Students in the Milstein Program in Technology & Humanity spent eight weeks this summer exploring New York City and thinking deeply about the implications of technology.

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Are Costly New Prescription Drugs Worth the Price?

Some countries use a relatively straightforward cost-effectiveness analysis to decide whether to green light insurance coverage of prescription drugs. That can prevent new drugs from entering the market that would be highly sought after by patients who value costlier care.

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Worker-centered policy doesn’t center on all workers

Assistant Professor Desirée LeClercq argues for more worker voice in U.S. “worker-centered’ trade policies.

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Digitization program calls for applications

Making a difference one digital collection at a time, the library's grants program partners with faculty and Ph.D. students.

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Humanities Scholars explore future careers through legal internships

Prameela Kottapalli ’23 and Louise Wang ’23 spent the summer in New York City learning about the complex processes of the legal system.

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Cornell-led team among DOE’s lithium-extraction finalists

A team led by Greeshma Gadikota from the College of Engineering was named a finalist for a national prize to domestically extract lithium – an essential ingredient for a greening world.

Harrison College Scholars explore politics, wellness, environment in summer work

From Ithaca to Hawaii to Ecuador, students in the Robert S. Harrison College Scholars Program in the College of Arts & Sciences took advantage of the summer as a time to explore their research interests.

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Teachers critical to detecting and reporting child maltreatment

School closures during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic may have resulted in at least 5,500 fewer reports of endangered children, according to a new study showing teachers’ essential role in the early detection and reporting of child maltreatment.