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Prolonged immaturity an evolutionary plus for human babies

The long period of helplessness in human babies and other species, long thought to be a drain on resources, is actually an evolutionary advantage, Cornell researchers say.

Center for Social Sciences announces 2021-22 faculty fellows

As CCSS fellows, a dozen faculty members representing seven colleges and schools will pursue ambitious research projects on issues ranging from political polarization to environmental justice.

“Shaping the Future of Work” published

A new social contract is possible if workers, business, labor, education and government work together, ILR emeritus professor Lee Dyer and Tom Kochan say in the new edition of their book.

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The impact of the white gaze at work

ILR Assistant Professor Courtney McCluney co-authored new research exploring the ways in which white gaze permeates organizations and is experienced by Black women in the workplace.

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Pandemic reshaped ‘small world’ campus networks

The shift to hybrid instruction last fall made face-to-face enrollment networks on campus smaller, less connected and more fragmented, according to an analysis by Cornell sociologists.

DE&I expert Tony Byers joins ILR dean on "WORK!"

In the latest episode of the ILR School’s podcast, Dean Alex Colvin and Tony Byers discuss the increased role of diversity, equity and inclusion in the workplace.

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New lab studies role of gender in security forces

The new Gender and the Security Sector Lab, launched Jan. 4, is using an interdisciplinary, social scientific approach to study the role of gender in security forces – including police, military and peacekeeping forces.

People follow a crowd, no matter its politics

When it comes to evaluating news, people tend to trust the opinions of a large group whether it’s composed of liberals or conservatives, new Cornell Tech research has found.

The downside of a startup

New research co-authored by ILR School Professor M. Diane Burton shows that working for a startup can have long term negative financial implications with employees hired by startups earning roughly 17% less over the next 10 years than those hired by large, established firms.

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