‘Racial uplifts’ aid Asian American well-being

Positive everyday racial encounters may increase self-esteem and help counteract negative experiences from discrimination, according to new Cornell psychology research.

Maria Fitzpatrick named to the National Academy of Social Insurance

The National Academy of Social Insurance (NASI) has announced the election of Cornell economist Maria Fitzpatrick as a member. The honor recognizes her contributions in the areas of child and family policy, the economics of education, and retirement policy.

Around Cornell

Work from home success linked to work/life boundaries

The benefits of working from home are greater for those who work solely during standard business hours, according to new ILR research.

Results of innovative Cornell-led public opinion survey to be released Friday

Results from the Cornell-led 2022 Collaborative Midterm Survey will be released Friday. The innovative survey of more than 19,000 Americans recorded opinions on a range of public affairs topics. It also will advance the science of survey research.

Around Cornell

Product images could boost food pantry use

Cornell researchers found that visual depictions of food pantry offerings, including brand names, have an ameliorative effect on negative product perceptions.

MLK's 1960s visits to Cornell still resonate today

Martin Luther King Jr.’s historic visits to Cornell on Nov. 13, 1960, and April 14, 1961, came at a pivotal point in his life and in American political and social history.

Fewer than 40% of New Yorkers earn a living wage

The Cornell ILR Wage Atlas shows who in New York state earns living wages and where, helping policymakers and other stakeholders to understand patterns of inequality.

Meaningful but unused products hinder sustainability

Cornell research finds product attachment may unintentionally encourage less sustainable behavior, if people store away prized possessions and buy additional goods for practical daily use.

Pandemic put more parenting stress on mothers

A first-of-its-kind study of parents’ work arrangements during the pandemic shows that mothers working from home increased their supervisory parenting fully two hours more than fathers did, and women were also more likely to adapt their work schedules to new parenting demands.