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It doesn't have a brain or a heart, and its walk is a little like the scarecrow's, but a little headless, armless, trunkless two-legged robot, developed at Cornell University, can walk, wobble, hobble, limp, stride and stagger. But it can't stand still in any position without falling over. (April 7, 1998)

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Cornell will be one of 15 universities participating in a new project to support women studying science and engineering. Called "MentorNet," the project will use the Internet and electronic mail to connect female engineering, science and math students.

The world's smallest guitar — carved out of crystalline silicon and no larger than a single cell — has been made at Cornell University to demonstrate a new technology that could have a variety of uses in fiber optics, displays, sensors and electronics.

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Richard N. Zare, the Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor of Chemistry at Stanford University, will give the Harry S. Kieval Lecture In Physics at Cornell on Monday, March 31.

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Three advanced technologies are about to expand the horizons of health care, speakers at the 12th annual Cornell Biotechnology Symposium, "Frontiers in Biomedicine," will predict on Oct. 15 from 9 a.m. to 12:05 p.m. in the ground floor conference room of the Biotechnology Building at Cornell.

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Cornell materials scientists have come up with a novel technique that could vastly improve the performance and yield of silicon microelectronic and optical devices, which are used in semiconductor integrated circuits that power everything from computers to telephones.

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Cornell chemists have created the world's smallest wires and encased them in a plastic polymer, an accomplishment that could lead to a host of new electrical or optical uses at the nanometer scale.

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Although expensive and complicated to adjust, a split keyboard mounted onto the arms of a worker's chair can help reduce a typist's risk of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and other cumulative trauma disorders, according to a new Cornell study.

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A symposium to help science educators find ways of building programs that will encourage science students to consider international experiences as fundamental to their education will be held at Cornell June 9- 12.