Skip to main content

In the News

Alex Susskind, associate dean for academic affairs at the School of Hotel Administration, says that state and local regulators must do what they can to “give restaurateurs the absolute maximum potential for earning. In New York, for example, they stopped allowing alcohol takeout. I think that’s a mistake, frankly."

This article touches on the promise of success, and the pitfalls that can undermine the satisfaction of succeeding. Tom Gilovich, psychology professor, discusses this in the context of Olympians.

“It’s not a permanent thing — that’s an important thing to highlight,” says Luis Schang, adding that the vaccines are still working very well and vaccination rates continue to rise. “This is not something we have to do for years. This is weeks, perhaps a couple of months.”

 

“It’s not a permanent thing — that’s an important thing to highlight,” says Luis Schang, professor at Baker Institute for Animal Health. “This is not something we have to do for years. This is weeks, perhaps a couple of months.”

“People generally don’t realize that something so small could have such a big impact,” explains Vanessa Bohns, associate professor in the ILR School.

Susanne Marie Bruyere, director of the Yang-Tan Institute on Employment and Disability, says workers may now have a renewed opportunity to negotiate flex-place and flex-time conditions. 

“Bitcoin was designed as a digitally anonymous medium of exchange that did not involve a trusted third party, such as a central bank, but Bitcoin has failed abjectly at its stated objective,” says Eswar Prasad, professor of economics and trade policy.

A federal labor board ruling that green-lighted unions’ use of the inflatable protest symbol “Scabby the Rat” highlights longstanding tension between free speech protections and federal labor law restrictions. Risa Lieberwitz, professor of labor and employment law at the ILR School, discusses the ruling. 

This op-ed from Russell Weaver, quantitative geographer at the IRL school, discusses enhanced unemployment insurance. He writes workers getting these benefits are now in a stronger position to reject exploitative and dehumanizing work.

The pandemic may permanently change the hotel industry’s approach to services like housekeeping and check in. Christopher Anderson, professor in the School of Hotel Administration, says we could see a system similar to airlines – where guests choose the services they are willing to pay for. 

“People are building really interesting – but mostly experimental – tools. These are being built mostly by amateurs who do not understand how actual finance works,” says Emin Gün Sirer, associate professor of computer science. “So some of these ‘LEGO building blocks’ are quite interesting and do things that Wall Street cannot do. But some of them end up interacting in unforeseen ways.” 

“Rapid increases in sea level rise and heat that will affect many of Asia's apparel workers directly have received little attention,” write Jason Judd and J. Lowell Jackson of the New Conversations Project out of the ILR School.