Skip to main content

Cornell researchers have determined that a hemp plant’s propensity to “go hot” – become too high in THC – is determined by genetics, not as a stress response to growing conditions.

The Yang-Tan Institute in the ILR School has secured a $646,000 gift from K. Lisa Yang ’74 to launch the Autism Transition to Adulthood Initiative, aimed at helping students with autism achieve success after high school.

Transferring genetic markers in plant breeding is a challenge, but a team of grapevine breeders and scientists at Cornell AgriTech in Geneva, New York, has come up with a powerful new method.

New research from the lab of Christine Smart in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences shows that wild tomato varieties are less affected by deadly bacterial canker than traditionally cultivated varieties.

Faculty members Anthony Burrow and Julia Felippe, Ph.D. ’02, have been appointed provost’s fellows for public engagement, to advance Cornell’s public engagement mission and initiatives around community-engaged learning and research.

A 23-year partnership between the Rosamond Gifford Zoo in Syracuse, New York, and the College of Veterinary Medicine provides care for endangered species while giving veterinarians and students specialized training.

Maddie’s Shelter Medicine Program at Cornell provided four one-day veterinary wellness clinics in 2019 to pets of low-income residents of Schuyler County, New York, thanks to an Engaged Opportunity Grant from the Office of Engagement Initiatives.

Prior organic farming practices and plantings can have lasting outcomes for future soil health, weeds and crop yields, according to Cornell research.

Researchers from Cornell and the University of Wageningen used a social psychology approach to understand how dairy farmers’ views impact how and when they use antibiotics to treat their cows.